Longbow carbon view from below

Volagi and the Ground-Breaking Longbow Flex Stays

 

When Barley Forsman and Robert Choi set out to design our first frames, they knew they would be swimming against the current trends of the cycling industry of the time. The industry seemed to think that everyone desired bikes based off their race models. Bikes with steep angles and aggressive geometry. Bikes with so much stiffness built into the frames it became overkill and unpleasant to ride. Not only were these bikes detrimental to every day riders, but these bikes were also held back by rules the UCI (the bicycle racing worlds governing body) wouldn’t budge on: no disc brakes, and frames could not vary from “traditional” construction designs.

” When developing Volagi’s original bicycle frames, my co-inventor and I set out to design a bike best suited for “endurance” road cyclists. Endurance road cyclists, or riders, are cyclists who prefer to ride for longer distances, 100 km or more rather than compete in organized sanctioned races against other riders. Endurance riders are looking for a bike that still performs like a racing bike but, more importantly, that is comfortable and forgiving to bumps and road vibrations since they are on their bicycles for a long time” says Robert.

Previously, in order to isolate the rider, bicycle companies relied on one or a combination of existing options:
1.) Use thinner tubing at the rear of the bike to create more flex – which worked well for compliance but would deflect and steal energy from the rider when pedaling, as well as affect handling.
2.) Use elastomers or other energy absorbing materials – which absorb high frequency vibrations well enough but add undesired weight to the bike and do nearly nothing for large impacts.
Or
3.) Use a suspension linkage, like mountain bikes – which isolates the rider completely, but affects the geometry and handling of the bike, pedaling efficiency,  as well as adding too much weight to be desirable on a road bike.

To accomplish our goals, Robert and Barley created our patented Longbow Flex Stays, a design that completely isolates the rider from harsh road vibrations and impacts and provides ~6mm of movement at the saddle, while only allowing a fraction of that movement at the bottom bracket. What this does is isolates the rider in a seated position without affecting drivetrain performance, allowing for the snappy acceleration of a race bike without the harsh ride associated with it. Our Longbow Flex Stays also allow for energy absorption when standing, something that just adding an elastomer or suspension to the seat post will not do, and because of our oversized bottom bracket and tapered chainstays, the rider loses no power to the pedals.

We also took the time to engineer our LongBow Flexstays to work best with each material we use – Hi-Modulus Carbon Fiber, Titanium Alloy, and Cromoly Steel. Because each of these materials each have different characteristics and capabilities, a cookie cutter approach was not only impossible, but impractical. Our carbon frame, with its slightly shorter headtube, has the joint moved slightly back towards the seat tube. The Ti, slightly further forward. Our steel? We designed it to accommodate wider tires and changed the joint location completely vs. the other two frames.

We believe what we have accomplished with our line of bikes is a complete set of options that, no matter which you choose, will totally surpass you previous notions of how comfortable a bike can ride, while still maintaining the snappy, responsive feel you desire from a high end bicycle. Try a Volagi today, and discover your Will to Go, blaze new paths, and challenge preconceived notions of how and where you can ride a road bike.

 

Viaje XL, New Stealth Black Paint

 

 

Check out this new Viaje XL built up with SRAM Force CX-1 in the Black paint we just got in. Stealthy, cool, low key, with a splash of contrast so when people ask “Who makes that sweet bike?” all you will have to do is point at the down-tube and cruise on past. Built with CX-1, this bike is perfect for long tours on less than ideal terrain. The 1×11 gives you similar gearing to a conventional double with fewer parts to fail when you are far away from civilization. Also, the narrow-wide chain and rings help prevent dropped chains over ultra-rough terrain.

Available in all sizes and builds, reserve your Black Viaje XL today.

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Adventure Cyclist – June 2014

“Anyone who loves long miles will appreciate this bike. If you’re into century rides, gran fondos, or simply want to head out on the bike and spend countless hours finding yourself, this bike is worth a serious look.”

The Viaje was the subject of a road test by Adventure Cyclist magazine, a publication of the Adventure Cycling Association. Be sure to become a member of this great organization, and get this publication in your mailbox.

Volagi-first-look_fe

Outside Magazine Press

This creates a bike that tames the chatter of rough roads and silences even big hits like cattle grates and potholes. With clearance for large-volume road tires—there’s plenty of space for cross size knobbies, for instance—this is an awesome adventure bike that is just at home on dirt fire roads as it is pavement.

Full Article: http://www.outsideonline.com/outdoor-gear/gear-shed/cycle-life/The-Viaje-Ti.html

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Cycle Sports Japan Press

Translated from “’Crazy about Bikes’ This month’s bike”; Cycle Sports Japan, January 2014

Established brands are a safe choice, but finding that special bike from a little known brand is one of cycling’s attractions.

Volagi is a small brand established by former Specialized staff, their disc road bike turned some heads at Interbike in 2012. Often smaller brands like this can go relatively unnoticed, but ironically Volagi was thrown into the spotlight with a lawsuit from the owner’s former employer.

The bike that caused a stir is this, the Liscio 2. It’s main features are the long, gently curving seatstays. Thin, curved seatstays are not uncommon these days, but the fact that they bypass the seattube and attach to the toptube is where the Liscio’s originality lies. This “Logbow Flex Stay,” also used in the steel Viaje model, is the brand’s trademark design. The approach differs, but like the Trek Domane or Cannondale Synapse, the concept of allowing the seattube to move in order to increase comfort is the same. Aiming for the top with a bike designed for endurance is one of the brand’s concepts, born perhaps from the creators’ experience at Paris-Brest-Paris. With a disc brake only line-up, Volagi is unique in the market.

A few turns of the pedals reveals a neutral ride. The disc rotors catch a small amount of wind, but no surprises. This may sound like a negative impression, but it’s not. Many compliance-oriented bikes reveal a disconcerting gap in vibration transmission between front and rear end. (The Liscio) lets you feel the road at the front, then smooths out the bumps at the back. There’s no gap between what you see and what you feel, with excellent front-rear balance.

Even if you don’t notice over short distance, the reduced fatigue becomes noticeable over longer rides. The more you ride it, the more you will understand and appreciate it. It doesn’t have the acceleration of a top end race bike, nor is it especially light: looking down from a racing perspective, it may seem that there’s not much to praise. However, what the creators are aiming for is bike for riders looking to explore their full potential. They are aiming at an ideal road bike, without the limitations of UCi regulations. Road disc brakes still have a way to go, but the benefit of better function in the wet and when tired is for sure a good proposition.

Regardless of whether road disc brakes become widely accepted, this is definitely one for any bike enthusiast. I’ve ridden a number of disc road bikes, but this is the best buy so far. Pricier models are available, but they lose out on that easy-to-ride feeling. The brand’s potential and the balance of price and function make the Liscio 2 a very attractive proposition, especially for those interested in up-and-coming brands.

 

 

 

Liscio Custom Bike

Cyclist Magazine Press

There is an appreciable amount of give at the rear end of the Liscio, which absorbs a large amount of road buzz, although perhaps not quite as much as I had anticipated, especially when factoring the gangly seatpost into the equation. However, it was still a lot more comfortable than many other endurance bikes. This is certainly one for the long miles.

Full Article: Cyclist Magazine 2014 Liscio Review

Velo Magazine Press

Excerpt taken from Velo Magazine article, “Braking Point” by Caley Fretz, Volume 43/No. 3

“Disc brakes are better at being brakes. It seems an odd, obtuse statement, but it’s a highly relevant one. Good brakes are fast brakes. Good brakes are safe brakes. The notion that discs don’t belong on the road because they are too good—which some folks believe—flies in the face of both physics and logic.

Discs are more powerful, with better modulation, across more situations. They are so thoroughly predictable that it becomes possible to ride an increasingly fine line between traction and lockup, braking later and harder, cornering faster and with more control. In our testing, it was actually the best bike handlers who got the most out of them, as they could push the tiers to the ragged edge with confidence. They allow faster descents and quicker evasive maneuvers. They’re simply better than any rim brake, ever.”

Viaje-commuting

GravelBike.com Press

Volagi has succeeded in delivering one of the most versatile bikes on the market. It can be configured as a dedicated road bike, gravel grinder, commuter, or anything in between. The Viaje successfully blends utility and performance without exhibiting the shortcomings often found on competitors’ do-it-all models.

Full Article: http://www.gravelbike.com/?p=2773